Raw Food FAQ

Here is a collection of Raw Food FAQs. Hope it helps to answer some common questions about the raw food diet.

1. What is raw food?

2. Why eat raw food?

3. What can you eat on a raw food diet?

4. What are the benefits of eating this way?

5. Where do you get your protein?

6. Where do you get your calcium?

7. What about vitamin B12?

8. Where do you get iron?

9. Is eating organic food really important?

10. What does eating a mono meal mean?

11. How do you stay raw in the winter?

12. Are all raw food diets the same?

13. What is 80/10/10 or LFRV?

14. How many greens should I eat in a day?

1. What is raw food?

Raw Food is food that has been uncooked or heated only to temperatures less than 116 degrees. This preserves the food’s enzymes, nutrients, and life, which are then passed onto you when you eat it.

The very best raw foods to eat are fresh whole fruits and vegetables that have not been processed in anyway, but most raw foodies do eat juiced and dehydrated foods as well.

2. Why eat raw food?

There are many reasons people choose to eat raw foods, but above all it is the diet we were designed to eat. Left out in nature without any of the modern tools we have become accustomed to, we would choose fresh, whole, uncooked fruits and vegetables with perhaps the occasional nuts or seeds.

People also choose this lifestyle to increase their energy, heal their bodies, and lose weight. Who wouldn’t want to look and feel their best?

3. What can you eat on a raw food diet?

The very best food choices are always fresh, organic, raw, unprocessed fruits and vegetables. You can also choose to eat some raw nuts and seeds if you like.

Some raw foodies also eat sea vegetables, superfoods, sprouts, and juices. You can make delicious gourmet meals and treats that taste similar to cooked versions of familiar foods. The dehydrator is a great tool for making gourmet meals.

4. What are the benefits of eating this way?

There are many benefits to eating this way including but not limited to:

  • Increased Energy
  • Healthy Weight-loss
  • Help your body heal completely from illness
  • Great hair and skin and clear eyes… true beauty!
  • Increased Athleticism
  • Help heal our planet and save its animals

If you would like to read more about the benefits of eating this way, check out these pages…

Physical Benefits of Raw Food

Mental Benefits of Raw Food

Environmental Benefits of Raw Food

Spiritual Benefits of Raw Food

5. Where do you get your protein and do you get enough?

First, proteins main function for our bodies is growth, which we don’t do much of past adulthood. Growing babies do the most growing that a human does their entire lives, and mother’s milk has been shown to only contain 6% protein. So, it is pretty safe to say that we don’t need any more than 6% of our calories to come from protein.

Having said that, if you eat a range of fresh fruits and vegetables, you will be averaging around 8% calories from protein. All fruits and vegetables have protein in them, so as long as you are consuming enough calories you will be consuming plenty of protein.

If you are still concerned, there are always raw protein supplements on the market, but I highly recommend you research the issue yourself. I believe if you did, you would soon be convinced that this is unnecessary and probably capable of creating illnesses for you. Too much protein in our systems is a far more real concern than too little.

6. Where do you get your calcium?

Calcium is another one of those questions that come up often. Everyone thinks they need to drink cow’s milk to get enough calcium for strong bones. However, if you take a look at the studies, you will see that all the countries (including the U.S.) that consume the most dairy have the highest amounts of osteoporosis. The inverse is also true: the countries that consume the least amount of dairy have the lowest rates of osteoporosis.

The very best source of your daily mineral needs is fresh, raw vegetables and especially dark leafy greens. Make sure you are getting at least one head of dark lettuces a day and you will be getting the right amount of all the necessary minerals.

7. What about vitamin B12?

The vitamin B12 issue is not a raw food issue, really. Actually, most of the population is at risk for this deficiency because of our modern farming techniques.

B12 comes from the waste products of bacteria that live in the soil. Plants absorb this vitamin through their roots, which we then consume to get our vitamin B12. However, when modern agriculture came along and began dumping loads of chemicals on the soil to kill pests, they also killed the bacteria in the soil. Thus, depleting it of B12.

You can choose organic produce today and would have an increased chance of consuming more B12. You could also grow your own organic produce in your yard, which would yield you even more B12 because you wouldn’t have to wash your produce so fastidiously. We used to consume B12 by also consuming the small amounts of soil that was left on our produce, but with the food safety “scares” of late, everyone’s produce is now spic n span.

We also have bacteria in our gut that produces B12 in its waste. These bacteria feed off of carbohydrates, so steer clear of any diet regimen that calls for low-carbs if you want to maintain health levels of B12. Also, this vitamin’s uptake sites can become clogged when your diet contains too much fat, making you unable to absorb the B12 that you do consume/produce. So, a high-carb, low-fat diet is great for making and absorbing as much B12 as possible. This also happens to be the healthiest diet known! (Imagine that.)

8. Where do you get iron?

Iron is widely distributed in plant foods, but some good raw vegan sources of iron are green leafy vegetables, peas, broccoli, nuts, seeds, peaches, and dried fruits. You can also get iron from sprouted legumes and whole grains.

Anemia from iron deficiency is not a problem on a raw vegan diet when you are consuming enough calories from a wide variety of plant sources. Eating enough dark leafy greens a day ensures you are consuming the right amount of all your important minerals.

9. Is eating organic food really important?

Organic produce is always the preferred choice for many reasons. It is higher in vitamins and minerals, is has far less toxic chemicals in and on the produce, and it is the healthier choice for our planet. If you cannot afford all organic right away, check out this list of the most and least contaminated produce to decide where to start spending your money. Choose more organic produce when possible.

10. What does eating a mono meal mean?

Mono meals are meals that are created from just one food, usually fruit. People choose to eat this way for some or all of their meals because it is the easiest on our digestive system. Some great food choices for mono meals are bananas, mango, or papaya.

11. How do you stay raw in the winter?

I don’t find that it is any more difficult to be raw in the winter than any other time of the year. There is always fresh produce these days, so availability is never an issue for me. I have plenty of heat in my house and car and anywhere else I go to keep me warm. I have never once craved cooked food for warmth, but I have craved lots of cooked food because it is addicting!

Being winter is just another one of those excuses that gets into our heads and we use it against our own higher desires in times of weakness. Eat enough calories so that you don’t get overly hungry, eat your greens, and drink water, enough so that you keep most of your cravings at bay. Then use any other cravings blasting technique you know of when those darn thoughts come up and choose the best to be the Best You Possible!

12. Are all raw food diets the same?

No. There are many variations within the raw food world. Some raw foodies choose to eat raw meats and dairy – although I do not promote that idea.

The most common form of the raw food diet is the high-fat raw food diet where you consume many gourmet raw meals and treats where a large percentage of your calories are coming from fat in the form of nuts, seeds, coconuts, and avocados. This is where I started and is great to transition yourself away from the heavy feeling of cooked foods.

The best option is the low fat raw vegan diet. This is the diet we are designed to consume and the one that will make us feel the most healthy and full of life. Keeping your fat intake around 10% is key to creating the very best health possible.

13. What is 80/10/10 or LFRV?

They are both describing the low fat raw vegan diet. 80/10/10 refers to 80% calories from carbohydrates, 10% calories from protein, 10% calories from fat. LFRV is the acronym for Low Fat Raw Vegan. This is the healthiest raw diet I know of.

14. How many greens should I eat in a day?

You should try to consume 3% of your calories a day from dark leafy greens. This usually amounts to 1-2 store bought heads of lettuce. I add mine into smoothies and eat a huge salad for dinner to make sure I get mine in each day. This ensures proper mineral consumption.



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